Monday, November 30, 2009

Huckabee and the Clemmons case

This explains the issue so well:

This post is the personal opinion by HucksArmy Director David Schmidt.

Let me first start by saying that the killing of the four police officers in the state of Washington was a revolting and horrific act. Our deepest thoughts and prayers are with all those who are grieving and we trust that justice will be swift and strong.

The following are the details connecting Clemmons and Huckabee:

Maurice Clemmons is wanted for questioning by police in connection to the killing of four officers in Lakeland, Washington

Maurice Clemmons was sentences to a 108 year prison term for his actions in 3 incidents as a 16 year old youth. These actions appear to be the:

Robbery of cell phone and house appliances from unoccupied house
Robbery of purse off of a women without the use of a weapon
Possession of a firearm

Huckabee On May 3, 2000, Gov. Mike Huckabee commuted (lessened) Clemmons’ 108 year sentence to 47 years, 5 months and 19 days, which made him eligible for parole that day.

The Parole Board granted his parole July 13, 2000.

He was released Aug. 1, 2000.

In light of what appears to be Clemmons killing of 4 officers, would anybody want this guy to ever be free to do that? No.

Is it excessive to sentence a person to a 108 year sentence for 3 serious but non-violent crimes as a 16-year -old youth? I think so. You may disagree.

Did Huckabee know that Clemmons was going to apparently kill four police officers 9 years after his parole from prison? No.

The question in regards to Huckabee is whether he showed negligent judgment in commuting the sentence of Clemmons.

It is my opinion that Huckabee did not show a serious lack of judgment for allowing Clemmons to be eligible for parole after serving for 11 years. When considering that the crimes were non-violent and committed at the age of 16, I don’t believe that it is unreasonable to allow a person to be eligible for parole after serving 11 years.

We can’t blame Huckabee for a decision that he made without knowledge of future crimes although we can blame him for poor judgment based on what he already knew. Based on that, I think his judgment was well within the bounds of reason. You may differ in your opinion and you are welcome to do that.

Download official Arkansas court and clemency documents behind this post at:http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2009/11/30/2010388798.pdf

DISCLOSURE: I like Huckabee. I have met him a few times and have found him warm and consistent. I also am a leader of a grassroots group called HucksArmy that supported Huckabee in 2008 and helps advocate for conservatives and common-sense government. While this association may make you think that I only want to defend Huckabee because I like him, I encourage you to make your judgement based on the soundness of this post and not who I am.

2 comments:

R. George Dunn said...

This alleged person of interest is walking the streets due to the character of America's Law of Grace and mercy. Better to have a Man of conviction who is a cautious leader then one who throws away the key.

We live in a judicial system that is ran by politically correct feelings, that the line between circumstantial facts and direct evidence is so blurred, the Judge reads the Law to the Jurists and it seems to be like glass as the words fall to the floor, much like the truth of Jury Nullification.

The number of Souls who repented and have gone on to be respectable citizens from Governor Huckabee's pardon does not justify the loss of life from one who disrespects their Mercy. But to not have pardons for your sins, leaves your liberty in a very difficult position. The Old Testament with it's eye for an eye had a system of redemption. Not so sure about the Islam's Shariah Law for it to is an eye for an eye.

Don't opportunity do this often but this circumstance demands this:

And, behold a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? He said unto him, what is written in the law? how readest thou? And he, answering, said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right; this do, and thou shalt live.--Luke x. 25-28.

Then one of them, which was a lawyer, asked him a question, tempting him, and saying, Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul. and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets. --Matt. xxii 35-40. http://www.qhpress.org/quakerpages/qhoa/wilton.htm

Amen

We live in a judicial system that is ran by politically correct feelings, that the line between circumstantial facts and direct evidence is so blurred, the Judge reads the Law to the Jurists and it seems to be like glass as the words fall to the floor, much like the truth of Jury Nullification. Did you know that a jury is over the Judge and that if they can ignore evidence and declare the defendant innocent due to overriding circumstance. No appeal can be afforded to found innocent.

Jury Nullification Rights
http://hellomichigan.blogspot.com/2009/11/jury-nullification-rights.html

Lee Strong said...

One clarifiction. Governor Huckabee did not pardon the man. He communted - reduced - his sentence, but he did not release him. The parole board subsequently chose to release Clemmons.